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 For the first time in France, a major exhibition at the Mucem in Marseille traces the fight against HIV in France, but also on the other side of the Mediterranean, in Africa.
 Marseille: an exhibition at the Mucem on AIDS to remind us that the fight continues

Just 40 years ago, the New York Times published the first article on AIDS. The Mucem (Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisations) in Marseille is devoting an important exhibition to the political and social history of HIV, an epidemic that has stigmatised certain communities but also generated great struggles. This exhibition is a tribute to these struggles. It also carries a message: the epidemic continues and still kills, while all eyes remain focused on the Covid-19 pandemic.
 The Mucem retraces the history of AIDS fighters in an exhibition event

Published on 16 December 2021 

"As a HIV-positive former activist, I was a little apprehensive about visiting the exhibition on HIV/AIDS at the Mucem".
Christophe Martet
 At Mucem, the open memory of the fight against HIV

17/12/2021

By Nicolas Gateau  

Since Wednesday, the Mucem in Marseille has been offering a courageous and moving exhibition in memory of the fight against HIV/AIDS. Entitled "HIV/AIDS, the epidemic is not over", it looks back on 40 years of a pioneering fight that is still going strong. 
 A programme presented by journalist Stéphane Stasi, accompanied by Florent Molle (co-curator of the exhibition), Marie-Charlotte Calafat (Head of the Collections and Documentary Resources Department at the Mucem), the artist Régis Samba Kounzi around one of his works, and Patricia Enel, President of the Coordination Committee for the Fight against HIV in Paca Ouest Corse. 

Produced by Hugo Blandel Live Pictures.
 A programme presented by journalist Stéphane Stasi, accompanied by Florent Molle (co-curator of the exhibition), Marie-Charlotte Calafat (Head of the Collections and Documentary Resources Department at the Mucem), the artist Régis Samba Kounzi around one of his works, and Patricia Enel, President of the Coordination Committee for the Fight against HIV in Paca Ouest Corse. 

Produced by Hugo Blandel Live Pictures.
 World Aids Day: "the epidemic is not over

Forty years after its discovery, an exhibition at the Mucem in Marseilles retraces the history of the HIV epidemic: The epidemic is not over. 

The exhibition has also led to the publication of a collective work. Vincent Douris of Sidaction explains that he "wanted to make AIDS anything but a historical object. We sought to anchor the memory of AIDS in the present.
 The African photographic scene, both French- and English-speaking, is attracting more and more attention from the public and festival organisers. Proof of this is the place of artists from this continent presented at the last Rencontres d'Arles with THAWRA! SUDAN, STORY OF A SUDDENING or The New Black Vanguard. Often little known in Europe, their presence shows the vigour of their creation, its abundance and the power of the messages to be conveyed, whether it be issues related to gender equality or the persecution of sexual minorities in certain African countries.

Among these new generations, a voice is being raised in the French-speaking world to denounce the fate of homosexual or LGBT populations. This voice is that of Régis Samba-Kounzi, an artist who defines himself as an "Afro-queer" photographer whose roots cross France, Congo-Brazzaville, Angola and the DRC. An epithet that testifies to his life choices, his commitment to the fight against AIDS with Act UP-Paris in the 2000s, but also the fight he is currently waging with the LGBT communities in Africa.

Yannick Le Guillanton met him in Paris to discuss his project "Minorities". His images do not only document his activism, they are above all a means of telling stories, of making visible the lives of people who are confronted from near or far with illness and of raising the issue of homoparentality. Régis Samba-Kounzi knows that art remains a powerful means of raising awareness and acting to defend a just cause. His career is that of an artist whose life is in constant and curious dialogue with otherness.
 Sidaction Activity Report 2020
 Sidaction Activity Report 2020
 Sidaction Activity Report 2020
 Sidaction Activity Report 2020
 Sidaction Activity Report 2020
 Sidaction Activity Report 2020
 NICOLA LO CALZO's FINDINGS

A celebration of love for this month of May with the wonderful selection proposed by our guest Nicola Lo Calzo of photographers exploring the possibilities of expression of the marginalized, stigmatized and vulnerable body. His third finding is Régis Samba-Kounzi.
" Regis is a former activist of Act Up, an anti-AIDS association founded in Paris in the late 1980s, and one of the first openly queer photographers on the African continent. He questions the rejection of sexual minorities, a legacy of colonial laws and Western churches, and dives into the Congo's LGBTQI+ community with his friends. «With our faces hidden or uncovered, we have all decided to bear witness to explain our reality, to claim our dignity and our humanity, our right to life and, in the end, to change things.» Regis
 Dossier: Facing HIV/AIDS
Edited by Christophe Broqua, Monia Lachheb and Sandrine Musso.
The social and political dimensions of HIV/AIDS in the Maghreb are less well known than in other regions. The prevalence of the virus is certainly low, but at a time when the "end of AIDS" has become a global watchword, the Maghreb remains one of the regions where the epidemic continues to progress, largely concentrated in the most affected groups, known as "key populations". This issue looks at the history and current status of some of the associations, governments and international organisations working against HIV/AIDS in the Maghreb. Several contributions deal with the situation of "key populations", including some of their intersections: male homosexuals, sub-Saharan African migrants living in the Maghreb, Maghreb migrants living in Europe. Not only do these populations have to survive the disease, but they also have to cope with a stigma that is redoubled by the confrontation with HIV/AIDS. This issue does not limit itself to a set of classic academic articles, but gives the floor to some important actors, also proposing an innovative example of co-construction and restitution of research. In a context where the Covid-19 pandemic is masking and hindering the fight against HIV/AIDS, it invites us not to relax both scientific and political attention on this 'other' epidemic that appeared forty years ago but is still far from being overcome.
 Pan-Africanism at the roots of LGBTI+ struggles ?
Published on 1 April 2021 by Komitid

It may well be that we have much more to learn from the silenced history of people from enslaved and colonised sexual and gender minorities, as well as from black and pan-Africanist resistance struggles.
It is common to hear that the LGBTI+ struggle on the African continent is an import of white western "human rights". But what if things had actually gone the other way? This is one of the unprecedented questions that is increasingly being raised in Afro LGBTI+ activist circles. Struggles against racism, homophobia and transphobia are long-standing struggles that have their historical origins in the age-old struggles for emancipation and the quest for justice. What is less well known is the ancient legacy that this specific struggle for dignity owes to the struggle for Black emancipation, through the systemic dehumanization we have been subjected to throughout history since, notably, humanity's entry into the modern era in the late 15th century. 
In August 2020, the first Pan-African Pride took place. It was an opportunity for mainly English speaking LGBTI+ people - African and Afrodescendant, but not only - to reclaim their history. For in these times, when the concept of white, Eurocentric universalism is so easily brandished to silence those who question the dominant patterns, it may well be that we have much more to learn from the silenced history of people from enslaved and colonised sexual and gender minorities, as well as black and pan-Africanist resistance struggles.
 "Only our courage is contagious" By The Gazette / 4 May 2020
 
Over the rainbow, Episode 3: Régis Samba-Kounzi