French-Congolese-Angolan Visual artist born in 1969 in Brazzaville. He is part of the pioneer generation of openly gay photographers and since 1988 of AIDS activists from the african continent. Former Planet Africa and Act-Up Paris activist where he advocated for many years. From 2001 to 2009, he contributed to the writing of articles for the magazine Action, the monthly magazine of Act Up, as well as in the newsletter of Protocol South. The human being is central in his engagement.

Since 2010, he is invested in a long-range artistic photographic and autobiographical story. In the world of photography, Africa is often exposed to what author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie calls "the danger of a unique story : if we hear only one story about another person or another country we risk a critical incomprehension ". That's why he explores, especially in French-speaking Africa, the living conditions of minorities, marginalized and vulnerable by race, class, validism, gender, HIV/AIDS, religious or sexual orientation. Documenting their relations with the rest of society and their strategies of survival and resistance. A reappropriation of the discourse which addresses first to minorities, and then to the dominante majorities, north and south, also.

This global project, titled Minorities, has already gone through several series (Inside, Lolendo, Erzulie, Molendé, Bolingo, Backstage), and will have other stages in Africa, the Caribbean and beyond. He was a collaborator and the partner of the photographer Nicola Lo Calzo and the queer artist, Julien Devemy. Occasionally he responds to orders for photographic work for organizations including Progrès santé sans prix (PSSP), Sidaction, Coalition Plus, le Kiosque Info Sida/Checkpoint Paris.

Currently, he lives and works between Paris and Kinshasa.

The Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford has exhibited the photographic series "Lolendo" from 1 June 2021 to 30 June 2022.

His photographic work has been presented on Thursday 23 September 2021 at the APELA Congress: ''Activisms and Queer Aesthetics in African Literature'' and will be published by Editions Karthala and the Canadian Journal of African Studies.

Speaker at the "Collecting, preserving and exhibiting the social history of HIV/AIDS" study day devoted to public representations of the epidemic. he was part of the monitoring committee of the exhibition "HIV/AIDS : The epidemic is not over! " which took place at the Mucem in Marseille from 15 December 2021 to 2 May 2022.
 
Act Up's mode of expression is recourse to illegality and civil disobedience. At Sidaction 1996, the president of the association, Christophe Martet, apostrophaed the Minister of Culture, Philippe Douste-Blazy, head-on to oppose the expulsion of foreign patients, calling France a ‟shitty country‟.
 Act Up's mode of expression is recourse to illegality and civil disobedience. At Sidaction 1996, the president of the association, Christophe Martet, apostrophaed the Minister of Culture, Philippe Douste-Blazy, head-on to oppose the expulsion of foreign patients, calling France a ‟shitty country‟.
 Act Up's mode of expression is recourse to illegality and civil disobedience. At Sidaction 1996, the president of the association, Christophe Martet, apostrophaed the Minister of Culture, Philippe Douste-Blazy, head-on to oppose the expulsion of foreign patients, calling France a ‟shitty country‟.
 ‟Act Up, we don't just kill time" A film by Christian Poveda
 
Action by Act Up-Paris in front of the Elysée gardens in protest against the stagnation of France's contribution to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.
 COPY = RIGHT: Global south countries need access to generic antiretrovirals
 Rashomon is a term from psychology that refers to the subjectivity of perception and recall, by which observers are able to produce substantially different but equally compelling accounts of an event. It is named for the 1950s Japanese
film Rashomon directed by Akira Kurosawa, in which a crime witnessed by four individuals is described in four mutually contradictory ways.
 Demonstration for the regularization of undocumented migrants in Paris, 2002

In 1992, the first actions, often inter-associative, against the expulsion of sick foreigners began. In the chronology of Act Up-Paris, one can read: ‟August 1993, Operation of the Commission against the Expulsion of the Sick (formerly Collectif contre l'Expulsion des Malades) to prevent the expulsion of a Tunisian, who was ill with AIDS. At the end of this operation, the latter was placed under house arrest. From September 1993 to June 1, 1994, this type of operation was repeated more than twenty times. ‟June 1994: Launch of the operation ‟Action pour le droit des malades étrangers en France‟ (Action for the rights of foreign patients in France), which brought together some twenty associations on the initiative of Act Up-Paris.
 
15th International AIDS Conference in Bangkok. 2004

Activists from all over the world, at the initiative of Act Up-Paris, invaded Gilead's stand. They held a die-in, then took over the place, throwing down literature brochures, sticking up posters and throwing ‟fake blood‟, to denounce unethical clinical trials conducted in Africa and Asia.
 
World AIDS Conference 2002 in Barcelona
 Nothing Without Us: The Women Who Will End AIDS
A film by Harriet Hirshorn
2017
 Archives
Fonds: Act Up-Paris (1989-2014) [125.55 ml]. Rating: 20140474/1-20140474/406. Pierrefitte-sur-Seine: French National Archives
 Julien Devemy, queer artist, former vice-president and media manager of Act Up-Paris. Barcelona, 2002
 The Impatient Dr. Lange: One Man's Fight to End the Global HIV Epidemic

by Seema Yasmin

The Impatient Dr. Lange is the story of one man's struggle against a global pandemic—and the tragic attack that may have slowed down the search for a cure. Seema Yasmin charts the course of the HIV epidemic and Dr. Lange's career as a young doctor who blazed his own path and dedicated his life to HIV.
 The Impatient Dr. Lange: One Man's Fight to End the Global HIV Epidemic

by Seema Yasmin

The Impatient Dr. Lange is the story of one man's struggle against a global pandemic—and the tragic attack that may have slowed down the search for a cure. Seema Yasmin charts the course of the HIV epidemic and Dr. Lange's career as a young doctor who blazed his own path and dedicated his life to HIV.
 
Artisan du monde's Equity Newsletter. 2005
 Action against Coca-Cola for letting its HIV-positive employees die. 2002

Act Up-Paris joins the campaign led by Health Gap and Act Up-New York against Coca-Cola.
Coca-Cola officials believe that providing access to AIDS treatment for 1.5% of their employees in Africa is sufficient.

Coca-Cola and HIV/AIDS in Africa :
Coca-Cola pays for full treatment, including antiretroviral drugs, for 1,500 of its employees or their relatives who are infected with AIDS, but does not care about the 100,000 men and women employed by its subcontractors to bottle and distribute Coke products under exclusive license.
 Coca-Cola is the largest private sector employer in Africa, employing 100,000 people in the distribution of Coke products in all but two African countries.
 Coca-Cola makes huge profits from employees who are facing an epidemic of unprecedented proportions. In some countries, 25% of the population is infected.

Every day, 8,000 people with AIDS die because they do not have access to the drugs that have incredibly improved the health of people with AIDS in rich countries.
 For the 20th anniversary of Act Up-Paris, Yagg publishes video testimonies of former activists
 ECCE HOMO
Documentary video by Rémy Yadan, color and sound, duration 10mn, 2003
 Julien & I on the cover of the Têtu diary, N°20, July/August 2002
 TAKE THIS WALTZ
Choreographic creation by Rémy Yadan, Théâtre des Louvrais in Cergy, 2004
 Action against Coca-Cola for letting its HIV-positive employees die. 2002

Act Up-Paris joins the campaign led by Health Gap and Act Up-New York against Coca-Cola.
Coca-Cola officials believe that providing access to AIDS treatment for 1.5% of their employees in Africa is sufficient.

Coca-Cola and HIV/AIDS in Africa :
Coca-Cola pays for full treatment, including antiretroviral drugs, for 1,500 of its employees or their relatives who are infected with AIDS, but does not care about the 100,000 men and women employed by its subcontractors to bottle and distribute Coke products under exclusive license.
 Coca-Cola is the largest private sector employer in Africa, employing 100,000 people in the distribution of Coke products in all but two African countries.
 Coca-Cola makes huge profits from employees who are facing an epidemic of unprecedented proportions. In some countries, 25% of the population is infected.

Every day, 8,000 people with AIDS die because they do not have access to the drugs that have incredibly improved the health of people with AIDS in rich countries.
 
Global Day of Action Against Patent Ordinance in India. February 26, 2005
 
Global Day of Action Against Patent Ordinance in India. February 26, 2005